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  • Commissioned by ProWein for the second time, the Geisenheim University has again surveyed more than 2,300 experts in the wine industry from 46 countries on international wine markets, marketing trends, developments in online wine sales and the economic situation. The survey conduc…
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  • With the mainland set to become the world’s second-largest market by 2020, the East is set to be red, white and rosé, opening up a host of opportunities for vendors and importersWhile the wine industry in China has been booming for years now, the industry is far from the simple …
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  • Twelve years ago, Marc Curtis started a business with the unlikeliest of propositions: bring tourists to China to try its wine. “When I first started, I would speak to groups in the U.S. and the first question was, ‘Wait, there’s wine in China?’ and the second one was, ‘Lead…
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  • The importance of brand in the wine industryFor most businesses, brand is crucial because it enables you distinguish your product or service from your competitors.This is especially true in the wine industry where competition is fierce, especially in overseas markets.Protecting yo…
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  • The Opium Ships at Lintin, China, 1824, by William John HugginsBacchus only knows how much to-and-fro business has gone on between Australian wine leaders and politicians and the authorities and wine buyers of China in the last fortnight.SinceI first wrote of this, the intray has …
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  • While certainly few of us missed China’s rise to the position of a major economic power, that newly established prowess continues to fight the biased western preconception of wine and China. On the one hand we have the image of the Chinese wine drinker pouring cola in her Chilean…
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  • This year could be the start of something big for Chinese wine. Sainsbury’s, Wine Rack, Tesco and Berry Bros have taken delivery of the latest vintages, and there will be plenty more coming our way soon. Sceptical? You shouldn’t be: China has the second largest area under vine …
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  • Chinese wine has come a long way very fast. Although the industry can trace its lineage back to the 2nd century, the past 20 years have seen an astonishing growth in the number of vineyards planted.China has the second largest area under vine after Spain, and an increasingly thirs…
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  • With the economic boom, China has become one of the biggest spenders on imported goods and services. Previously, Beer and rice alcohol (Baijiu) had been the preferred alcoholic beverages consumed by the Chinese. However, this is changing, especially among the affluent middle class…
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  • Speaking todbHKprior to his annual Great Wines of the World event in Hong Kong, the flamboyant wine critic revealed a slew of plans that will mark his biggest and most ambitious move yet into mainland China’s vast wine market, with an end goal of creating a Starbucks-esque wine d…
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  • Already today China is a big force on the world market for wine. This week Britt, my co-author of this column, is in China. One of ten invited international wine experts to judge a wine competition with Chinese wines in the Ningxia region.Britt was there already in 2005, on a simi…
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  • Sun Miao is the owner of the Domaine des Ar?mes vineyardin the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region.In 2011, when my husband and I decided to return to China and set up our own winery, all our friends told us we were insane. We were living in France then: I was working at a wine-trading…
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  • When we think of wine countries, France and Italy are often top of mind.But it is not a stretch to suggest that the most important wine nation in the world may well be China. When you consider the size of China's emerging consumer demand, the exponential growth in vineyard pla…
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  • "More Chinese people like wine - they want to know more about it" - Interview, Alan's Wines & Spirits chairman Alan WangAlan Wang was bitten by the wine bug while he was studying in California. When he returned to his native China in 2011, he started a wine store…
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  • Chinese consumers are no longer regarded by wine exporters as a soft touchChina has been trying to produce high-quality wine that can compete in the international market ? EPAIt is unfortunate that Chinese wine drinkers seem to be deserting the produce of their own vineyards for …
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  • Booming Australian wine exports to China and Hong Kong are driving the strategy of the Chinese company behind Grand Dragon, as it prepares to build its own $80m winery in Victoria.NYTChina's third biggest wine company is aiming to have an $80 million winery up and running by 2…
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  • Chinese drinkers areshowing an increasing thirst forAustralianwines, making them the toast of exporters whose businesses are benefitting from the discerning palates of the country’s growing middle class and a multitude of buying options.Australianwine exports toChinagrew 51 per c…
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  • From seemingly nowhere China has become one of the world’s leading wine producers; from sweet ice wines produced in northern Liaoning province, to cabernet sauvignons cultivated in Ningxia bordering the Gobi desert, or those from the remote foothills of the Himalayas the country …
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  • The Chinese like to drink wine. China’s millionaires, of which there are beau coup, don’t think twice about dropping $300 on a bottle of wine. And, since China’s economy looks like it’s emerging from its recent doldrums, wine consumption is on the upswing. Not only is per capi…
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  • ATTRACTING drinkers who are occasional or non-wine consumers will be a key battleground in China in years to come, Adelaide based industry expert Dr Justin Cohen says.Australian wine — predominantly red — has experienced staggering growth in the past decade in China, with sales …
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